Earliest Evidence of Leather Clothing Found in 39,600-Year-Old Bone

A 39,600-year-old bone fragment with strange indentations has been found in Spain.

Researchers believe that the bone was used as a punch board for making holes in leather, which suggests that humans were wearing leather clothes in Europe 39,000 years ago.

This is the earliest evidence of humans making leather clothes, and it provides new insights into how early humans adapted to cold climates.

The bone fragment was found at the Canyars Cave site in Spain, which is known for its well-preserved remains of early humans. The bone fragment is made from the hip bone of a large mammal, and it has a series of evenly spaced indentations on one side.

The researchers believe that these indentations were made by a tool with a sharp point, and that they were used to make holes in leather.

The researchers also found evidence that the leather was tanned, which means that it had been treated with chemicals to make it more durable.

This suggests that early humans had a sophisticated understanding of leather-working, and that they were able to produce high-quality leather clothing.

The discovery of this bone fragment provides new insights into how early humans adapted to cold climates. Leather is a warm and durable material, and it would have been an essential part of early humans’ clothing.

The discovery of this bone fragment suggests that early humans were able to make and use leather clothing, which would have helped them to survive in cold climates.

The researchers believe that this discovery is significant because it provides new evidence of prehistoric humans’ technological capabilities. The ability to make and use leather clothing is a complex skill, and it suggests that early humans were more sophisticated than previously thought.

The discovery of this bone fragment also provides new insights into how early humans adapted to cold climates. Leather is a warm and durable material, and it would have been an essential part of early humans’ clothing. The discovery of this bone fragment suggests that early humans were able to make and use leather clothing, which would have helped them to survive in cold climates.

Sources

  • Doyon, L., Faure, T., Sanz, M., Daura, J., Cassard, L., & d’Errico, F. (2023). A 39,600-year-old leather punch board from Canyars, Gavà, Spain. Science Advances, 9(15). https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.adg0834

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